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Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Photographer
Carla Kogelman
Freedom of gender
Gomma Photography Grant 2022 Finalists

Gomma Photography Grant 2022

Freedom of gender

Photographer

Carla Kogelman

Freedom of gender

10 Jan, 2023

When I was 20, the human world was easily divided into male, female, gay, straight, bi, drag queen and transvestite. A girl was a she and a boy was a he. Those were the main boxes. Now, forty years later, the world has become more diverse. More young people identify and present themselves as transgender or non-binary. The theme seems to be 'in', and what else can I contribute to this? how do I visualize this? Noelle posted a call on her socials and that set a ball rolling for a generation where there is a lot of online contact. Sometimes even more than in real life. In addition to the photos, I have asked everyone to provide a text about their attitude to life. Some people feel strongly that the gender they are assigned at birth does not match how they feel and how they want to express themselves. What someone needs to experience that the gender identity does match the appearance varies enormously. In this series I meet a new generation of people who show me how they live their lives. A portrait series about gender freedom.

About the photographer

Carla Kogelman

Carla Kogelman (NL, 1961) has worked in the theatre industry for 25 years. In December 2011 she graduated at the Foto Academie Amsterdam. In her work she captures the daily life of people, especially children. Being around the same people for a long time, she becomes invisible. This gives her the opportunity to get a good insight into the lives of her subjects and reach the real story behind what is observed superficially. Another fascination is the back stage life of theatre, film and sport. Most fascinating to her is how the children in different circumstances interact with each other, how their bodies communicate, and how the relationships emerge and evolve. She grew up in a big family herself and suggests that she might be reflecting on herself while capturing the life of these children.